Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair to showcase works from over 1,500 First Nations artists during Festival

by | Jul 22, 2022 | News Brief | 0 comments

The Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair returns to Larrakia Country after two years as part of the larger annual Darwin Festival, showcasing art, fashion and design.

This year, the Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair Foundation’s (DAAFF) art fair, running both in-person and online from August 2 to 7, will showcase works from more than 1,500 First Nations artists from across Australia.

The prestigious art fair is in conjunction with the DAAFF’s two Indigenous Fashion Projects (IFP) events, Country to Couture and the National Indigenous Fashion Awards (NIFA), which brings the country’s acclaimed First Nations artists and designers into the global spotlight.

DAAF Foundation artistic director Shilo McNamee said the art fair’s events bring people together from all over the world to engage in the rich cultural tapestry, heritage, and storytelling of the world’s oldest living culture.

“We have been showcasing the creations of Australia’s First Nations peoples for 16 years. The fair supports over 75 art centres and ensures that 100 per cent of all profits go back to the artists and their communities,” Ms McNamee said.

Last year, the fair realized a record $3.12 million in sales with 100 per cent of profits going back to art centres and their communities.

The event is comprised of Country To Couture (August 2), which highlights the textile design movement and will present collections from some of Australia’s most talented First Nations fashion designers and artists; National Indigenous Fashion Awards (August 3), celebrating the innovation, diversity and ethical practices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists and fashion designers; and the Aboriginal Art Fair on August 5-7.

“With Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art, fashion and design seeing a meteoric rise these last years, we feel this recognition is just the beginning and we still have a long way to go in terms of representation,” said DAAF executive director Claire Summers.

“Storytelling is a major part of First Nations culture and we still have so much to learn. Connecting with artists and understanding and appreciating their practices and traditions is a fantastic way to do this.”

For more information or to buy tickets to Country to Couture, the NIFA and DAAF visit the website.

 

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